Public Private Partnership

The Australian Government confirmed in 2017 that the 130km section of Inland Rail from Gowrie to Kagaru in Queensland will be delivered through a Public Private Partnership (PPP). ARTC has been working in conjunction with the Australian Government to establish the PPP.

The Gowrie to Kagaru sections of Inland Rail include approximately 8.5km of major tunnelling through the Toowoomba, Little Liverpool and Teviot ranges, and will need to address a range of complex engineering and construction challenges. The PPP will facilitate private sector expertise and innovation in the design and construction of these sections of Inland Rail.

The funding approach for Inland Rail was subject to extensive market testing and will manage risk and drive value for taxpayers in delivering this nationally significant project.

The delivery arrangements for the PPP are still in a preliminary stage and the respective roles of each party have not been finalised. In general terms, ARTC will be the counterparty to the PPP and the private partner will be responsible for the design, build, financing and maintenance of this segment of the project.

ARTC is currently seeking registrations of interest prior to undertaking market sounding, with the commencement of the formal procurement process expected in Q1 2019. You can either complete and submit the form electronically, or you can download, complete, sign, scan and email it to irppp@artc.com.au

What is a PPP?
A PPP is a service contract between the public and private sectors where the Government pays the private sector (typically a consortium) to deliver infrastructure and related services over the long term. The private provider will generally design, build and finance the construction of the relevant infrastructure, and then operate and/or maintain it to specified standards over a 25 to 30-year period.
PPPs enable the government to leverage off the expertise of the private sector in the design and construction of complex infrastructure, whilst at the same time effectively transferring construction and whole of life risks to the private sector. PPPs have been used in recent years for both social infrastructure (eg. hospitals, schools, prisons) as well as economic infrastructure (eg. roads, rail etc).


The Australian Government confirmed in 2017 that the 130km section of Inland Rail from Gowrie to Kagaru in Queensland will be delivered through a Public Private Partnership (PPP). ARTC has been working in conjunction with the Australian Government to establish the PPP.

The Gowrie to Kagaru sections of Inland Rail include approximately 8.5km of major tunnelling through the Toowoomba, Little Liverpool and Teviot ranges, and will need to address a range of complex engineering and construction challenges. The PPP will facilitate private sector expertise and innovation in the design and construction of these sections of Inland Rail.

The funding approach for Inland Rail was subject to extensive market testing and will manage risk and drive value for taxpayers in delivering this nationally significant project.

The delivery arrangements for the PPP are still in a preliminary stage and the respective roles of each party have not been finalised. In general terms, ARTC will be the counterparty to the PPP and the private partner will be responsible for the design, build, financing and maintenance of this segment of the project.

ARTC is currently seeking registrations of interest prior to undertaking market sounding, with the commencement of the formal procurement process expected in Q1 2019. You can either complete and submit the form electronically, or you can download, complete, sign, scan and email it to irppp@artc.com.au

What is a PPP?
A PPP is a service contract between the public and private sectors where the Government pays the private sector (typically a consortium) to deliver infrastructure and related services over the long term. The private provider will generally design, build and finance the construction of the relevant infrastructure, and then operate and/or maintain it to specified standards over a 25 to 30-year period.
PPPs enable the government to leverage off the expertise of the private sector in the design and construction of complex infrastructure, whilst at the same time effectively transferring construction and whole of life risks to the private sector. PPPs have been used in recent years for both social infrastructure (eg. hospitals, schools, prisons) as well as economic infrastructure (eg. roads, rail etc).